Bridge Nets, Meaning and the Co-curricular

Evangel – Fall 2013

Articles

This fall tens of thousands of young people have begun studies after high school. They have worked hard for this. Having won the prize of admission reserved for those disciplined in study, they will enter rich academic environments, richer than they have ever known, to pursue the promise of a good job.

They will find courses devoted to every question under the sun. But there is one question for which they will search in vain: the question of life’s meaning, of what one should care about besides a job and why, of what life and living is for.

I’ve been thinking about this vacuum recently. Western public education began with the notion that life’s most important questions are appropriate subjects for students to explore. This has all but disappeared. It is perhaps truer to say that what is most important in life has been collapsed, within education itself, to economics. Economic globalization of the last three decades or so has been the final squeeze to push questions of value and meaning out of formal learning. The disciplines with the oldest, deepest connection to these questions, the humanities, including the study of religion, have been badly weakened, even within secular universities. Research, the capacity to produce “true value” for new economic opportunity, is now king. Education is about commodities and the quantifiable. The question “what is life for?” is homeless here.

The loss of the quest for meaning has come at a staggering price. The September 2012 Maclean’s headlined Canadian students feel hopeless, depressed, even suicidal. Among other things it discussed the results of a 2011 survey of 1,600 University of Alberta students, where “about 51 per cent reported that, within the past 12 months, they’d felt things were hopeless. Over half felt overwhelming anxiety. A shocking seven per cent admitted they’d seriously considered suicide, and about one per cent had attempted it.” Canadian universities don’t have a monopoly on these things. At Cornell University in New York, the solution for hopelessness and depression has been to install bridge netting under the seven bridges leading to campus to catch jumpers on their way to class. Sadly even the article itself reduced the problem to one of “mental health.” Mental health is serious stuff, and important to acknowledge and deal compassionately with. The issue though is complex. Hopelessness, depression, and anxiety has much to do with the conditions of life, like prior to a major assignment. There will, as the saying goes, “always be prayer in schools as long as there are exams.”

Despite globalization, the quest for meaning persists. At one level it helps us to cope. With a “why,” Victor Frankl observed, we can deal with any “how.” For Christians though, our longing for transcendence empowers us to invest in riches that can be enjoyed forever. The Scriptures call it “hope in Christ” (I Cor. 15). “Hoping in Christ” helps us to endure too. It also gives us the Model for living, a Christ-shaped character, and a horizon far past the hollow promises of consumer culture, a reason to spend life for the sake of others.

Since questions of meaning are always questions of the spirit, and the right and proper subject of Christian education, it would be easy here to say “Hooray for Christian education!”

However, life’s meaning is far more than “a question” of the spirit. It is rather a quest, a hunger of the spirit. That’s why not all churches or even places like ABC are automatically places of authentic spiritual food. Sometimes Christian institutions bear a strange similarity to religious studies classrooms where information about God or belief systems is passed off as sufficient for Christian discipleship. Information however, while important and necessary, is hardly sufficient for becoming a follower of Jesus.

At the heart of our quest for meaning is Jesus who said, “I am the Way, the Truth, the Life.” He didn’t say, “I’ve come to tell you ‘Ten Steps to walk in the Way.’” He didn’t say, “I’ve come to tell you the truth.” He said, “I am the Truth.” He offers Himself. This of course matches our yearnings precisely. They are for Love Himself. Information is not enough for this quest!

Jesus knew all of this! He knew that what disciple-learners needed more than anything in their quest was a model of loving surrender to the Father. This was a lengthy process, even under the master Teacher! Along the way there were questions, doubts, fears, denials, prejudices, jealousies, and a host of other distractions. Their enemy was ours too: they thought that the “Way” was the way of privilege and power. All of them desert Him at one point. After three years of instructions they still think that (Acts 1:8ff)! Throughout this jagged journey to learn Him, every moment was a teachable one. He never gives up on them.

Regardless of how that quest unfolded in particular cases, the common thread was that Jesus was always with them, entering life with them, challenging, encouraging, whittling away their self-preoccupation. All this to say that for Jesus curriculum was not enough. He longed for them to experience His inner life. His presence was key!

Dallas Willard puts it this way: “…spiritual formation rests on the indispensable foundation of death to self and cannot proceed except in so far as that foundation is being laid and sustained. You cannot follow Jesus from a distance. You do life with Him” (Renovation of the Heart, p. 64).

The quest for meaning is satisfied through challenging conversation and encounters where life’s big questions are faced honestly. In fact, our Gospels are both declaration and a “working through” of the conversations about what it means to live for Someone else. Without those conversations, they wouldn’t exist! Peter Berger is correct: “Worldview hangs on the thin thread of conversation.”

As they walked with Him, Life seeped in. Jesus’ own dreams of a new, Other-oriented life took shape. They learned to serve by serving. They learned to love by loving. They learned to be loved, by being loved. Meaning arrived not through armchair philosophizing, but through fresh encounters with Life Himself. Jesus knew that the transformative turning points of life are already in the journey, not just in the synagogue.

It is easy, and so tempting, to think of what is done outside the classroom as unimportant. It is not. The stakes are too high, the consequences too stark, the possibilities for Others too rich, and the horizons of meaning too beautiful, to abandon the co-curricular.

Dr. Fraser is the Director of Learning Services as well as a professor who specializes in New Testament and Christian history; theological pedagogy; and social ethics in contemporary education. He credentials include B. Th. ’73 Alberta Bible College; B. Ed. ’73 University of Calgary; M.C.S. ’86 Regent College; Ed. D. ’08, University of Alberta Academic.

Ron has also published extensively: From Tinkering to Transformation: Christian Ministry in an Age of Secularism (1993, Lectures of the College of Churches of Christ in Canada. Published by the College of Churches of Christ in Canada); A History of the Restoration Movement in Canada (2008, as in Foster, Blowers, Dunnavant, and Williams, The Encyclopedia of the Stone-Campbell Movement. Eerdmans); Ron has also written numerous articles for the Christian Standard from 1989-2002 and the Alberta Bible College Evangel from 1982-2011.

His ministry activities include Alternative Dispute Resolution; Mediation Training and Peace Education; Ecclesial Leadership and Equipping Education Workships including Inspiring a Shared Vision through Appreciative Inquiry, Group Needs Assessment, Strategic Planning, Team Building, Growing and Empowering Influencers, etc.; Preaching.

In his spare time Ron enjoys hiking, woodworking, visiting with people.

Other articles by Dr. Ron Fraser: